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Roger Waters and David Gilmour continue to be at odds with one another, with Waters being the most public about his issues with his former Pink Floyd bandmate.

The latest issue Waters has voiced is in relation to the reissue of Pink Floyd’s 1977 studio album Animals. Waters details in a lengthy post on his official website, “What precipitated this note is that there are new James Guthrie Stereo and 5.1 mixes of the Pink Floyd album ‘Animals,’ 1977. These mixes have languished unreleased because of a dispute over some sleeve notes that Mark Blake has written for this new release. [David] Gilmour has vetoed the release of the album unless these liner notes are removed. He does not dispute the veracity of the history described in Mark’s notes, but he wants that history to remain secret.”

Waters continues, “This is a small part of an ongoing campaign by the Gilmour [and his wife, Polly] Samson camp to claim more credit for Dave on the work he did in Pink Floyd, 1967-1985, than is his due. Yes he was, and is, a jolly good guitarist and singer. But, he has for the last 35 years told a lot of whopping porky pies about who did what in Pink Floyd when I was still in charge. There’s a lot of ‘we did this’ and ‘we did that,’ and ‘I did this’ and ‘I did that.'”

While Waters has agreed to the release of the new Animals reissue sans the liner notes, he did post the liner notes in their entirety within the aforementioned post to RogerWaters.com.

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Additionally, Waters also announced he’s working on a book saying, “I am in the middle of writing my Memoirs and inevitably some of it contains references to some of the content above. For anyone with a faint heart, I suggest you sit down, but anyone who likes a good laugh, sit back and f—ing howl! I’m going to sit back and howl along with you.”

Waters then shares an excerpt from his memoirs where he quotes a 1982 Gilmour interview where he talks about the iconic cash register intro to the Pink Floyd classic “Money.” Gilmour’s answer gives the impression that the register sound effect was his work, but Waters says otherwise.

“The reason everything DG is saying here to David Fricke sounds like gobbledygook is because it is f—ing gobbledygook,” writes Waters. “He has no f—ing idea what he’s talking about. Why? Because unless he was hiding under the f—ing chair, DG wasn’t there when I made that SFX tape loop for ‘Money’ in the studio I shared with my wife, Judy, at the bottom of our garden at 187, New North Road, Islington, next door to the North Pole Pub where I used to play darts!”

Needless to say, whenever this Waters memoir comes out, it has more than a little “must-read” potential.

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Erica Banas is a rock/classic rock news blogger who's well versed in etiquette and extraordinarily nice.